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Wake Server When Accessing Network Shares

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#1
nsainfreek

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I posted this on a different forum but was told to try and present the question here as the people here may be more knowledgable. I don't run WHS but was hoping you guys could still help me. I'm running Windows 7 Ultimate with a DIR-665 Router and have also tried a Netgear WNDR3700 Router.

I have a server with all my movie files and I would like to share them with other computers on my network. The other computers would mount network shares on their computer in order to access the server. However, the server is not accessed most of the times since it is a home server and I would like it to go to sleep when not in use. I could enable Wake-On-Lan, but that is an extra step to send a magic packet to wake the server up. I would like the server to wake when someone attempts to access one of the network shares.
There is the option of waking on ping, which would wake the server whenever there is any attempted communication. This is probably the path I want to take. However, with this option on the server wakes after just two minutes of going to sleep and does not go back to sleep. After reading a lot of threads on the web, it seems the router is doing an arp refresh (not sure if that's the right terminology). The router is asking "who has this ip address" and it hits all the computers on the network, which wakes the server. The router does this like every 2 minutes. Some people online have said that they got wake on ping to work properly but those were old threads and I couldn't get any answers.
Anyway, I've tried assigning static IPs on the network, shutdown the dhcp server, and bought a new router. Computer is still waking up shortly after going to sleep. I read somewhere that you can edit the arp table so that it doesn't bother the computer, but I'm not sure if that's possible since I have found no documentation of editing arp tables on routers.
Does anyone know if and how this can be done? Any response would be useful thanks.


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#2
J1mbo

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You'd need to connect to the router through telnet and create a static ARP entry for the WHS IP using arp -s. Whether or not that will survive a reboot is doubtful though.

Never heard of Wake-On-Ping - learn something everyday :)

#3
nsainfreek

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You'd need to connect to the router through telnet and create a static ARP entry for the WHS IP using arp -s. Whether or not that will survive a reboot is doubtful though.

Never heard of Wake-On-Ping - learn something everyday :)


So you're saying that if I create a static ARP entry the router would probably fail to boot? That's probably not what I want to do then. Any other ideas? I thought that other people may be trying to accomplish such a setup to have a mix of 24/7 accessibility, ease of use, and power savings. Apple has it's Wake-on-demand functionality which works by having the router send the magic packet while using bonjour to broadcast the services of the server. This would work except Mac's aren't really expandable (beside the Mac Pro) and I have around 10 HDs running in my server.

Is it possible to do something where if you try to access a network drive it auto sends a magic packet?

#4
J1mbo

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The apple thing sounds most cool. What I mean is that the static arp cache entry won't survive a router reboot, i.e. it will go back to being dynamic when you reboot the router for any reason.

Wake-On-Lan is just a packet with the MAC address repeated six times; I think the best you'll end up with is a scheduled task to send a wakeup packet periodically when the machine is on (or at logon) using the Windows task scheduler. I'm increasingly finding uses for a super-low-power box running from flash, and this is one example. It could sit there on the LAN, and send a WoL packet when it spots an arp request to the specified IP address (arp is the very first packet that will be sent when you try to make the connection and, since it's a broadcast, can easily be detected). I a netbook might fit the bill, but the packback period would be quite long.

#5
J1mbo

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Thinking about this some more an agent could easily be devised to run on the PC itself, bypassing the need for the centralised monitoing box. But not be me unfortunately :(

#6
nsainfreek

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The apple thing sounds most cool. What I mean is that the static arp cache entry won't survive a router reboot, i.e. it will go back to being dynamic when you reboot the router for any reason.

Wake-On-Lan is just a packet with the MAC address repeated six times; I think the best you'll end up with is a scheduled task to send a wakeup packet periodically when the machine is on (or at logon) using the Windows task scheduler. I'm increasingly finding uses for a super-low-power box running from flash, and this is one example. It could sit there on the LAN, and send a WoL packet when it spots an arp request to the specified IP address (arp is the very first packet that will be sent when you try to make the connection and, since it's a broadcast, can easily be detected). I a netbook might fit the bill, but the packback period would be quite long.


So If I input a static arp entry into the router, it'll be ok as long as I don't reboot the router? And I could just reinput the arp entry if the router was to ever need rebooting, correct? Do you know where I could look for instructions to access a router via telnet?

Scheduled task wouldn't work well for me since the system is not used at regular time intervals. What would need to be created to send a WOL when an arp request to a specified IP is sent out? Would it be a process or program? I'm not sure what you mean when you say "running from flash." Are you talking about a flash program?

Thanks for your responses so far!

#7
J1mbo

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Yes the router would be fine. Scheduled tasks can be set to run at logon and periodically (say every 5 mins).

Running from flash, as in a USB flash drive instead of a hard disk for an uber-low-power PC.

Re my agent idea, yes a compiled program that monitors the LAN (like Network Monitor does) and, when it sees the packet, sends a WoL packet. Maybe something like ArpAlert could be adapted, I might have a ponder on this over the weekend as it would be highly useful for me...

Cheers!

#8
nsainfreek

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Yes the router would be fine. Scheduled tasks can be set to run at logon and periodically (say every 5 mins).

Running from flash, as in a USB flash drive instead of a hard disk for an uber-low-power PC.

Re my agent idea, yes a compiled program that monitors the LAN (like Network Monitor does) and, when it sees the packet, sends a WoL packet. Maybe something like ArpAlert could be adapted, I might have a ponder on this over the weekend as it would be highly useful for me...

Cheers!


Alright, i'm going to try and see if I can figure out how to telnet into my router and make an arp entry. If you figure anything out, please let me know. Thanks!

#9
nsainfreek

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Well, I can't figure out how to input a static arp into the router. First off, I can't figure out how to telnet into the Dlink Dir 665. I managed to telnet into the Netgear wndr3700 but it won't let me create a static arp. When i use the "arp -s" command it doesn't seem to do anything. Any other recommendations would be appreciated.

#10
mikeje

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Hi nsainfreek

I know this is an old thread but did you ever get anywhere with your wake on demand.

I've just installed WHS 2011 and would love the server to be able to make when a request is made by my Sonos or Apple TV2.

Does anyone out there know how to make this work?

#11
PhoenixDown

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Would like to do this myself ... *subscribes to thread*




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