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riahc3

Performance tuning for Windows Server 2012 R2?

9 posts in this topic

Im using the full version of Windows Server 2012 R2 on ESXi.

 

I have it all working but I would like to tune it for storage and network streaming of movies. I store files as well on there but maybe AV and/or other processes (BT sync) bog it down and video is choppy even when streaming over a ethernet connection. If the WS is doing nothing, performance is fine.

 

Can someone help with fine tuning it?

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Well, what are you using to stream?

Also, how is the storage presented to the VM (a virtual hard drive, pass through, etc).

Also, how much memory did you allocate and how many CPU cores did you assign to the VM?

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3 hours ago, Drashna Jaelre (WGS) said:

Well, what are you using to stream?

Also, how is the storage presented to the VM (a virtual hard drive, pass through, etc).

Also, how much memory did you allocate and how many CPU cores did you assign to the VM?

Video (movies). 1080. Nothing higher.

Storage is presented as pass through.

Reading off vSphere Client, it has 1 virtual socket with 2 cores per socket.

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2 hours ago, riahc3 said:

Video (movies). 1080. Nothing higher.

Storage is presented as pass through.

Reading off vSphere Client, it has 1 virtual socket with 2 cores per socket.

Set it to use 4 cores, and see if that helps.

And make sure you have at least 4GB of ram.

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10 hours ago, Drashna Jaelre (WGS) said:

Set it to use 4 cores, and see if that helps.

And make sure you have at least 4GB of ram.

I do not hace 4 physical cores. Would not make much of a difference.

 

The VM has I think 10 or 12 GB assigned.

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5 hours ago, riahc3 said:

I do not hace 4 physical cores. Would not make much of a difference.

 

The VM has I think 10 or 12 GB assigned.

Then that's the problem here.

Transcoding/re-encoding is a very, very CPU intensive process.  And if you have a few small number of CPU cores available, then it's going to use more CPU time and cause performance issues.

If you plan on transcoding a lot, then you'd want a quad core or better CPU, IMO.

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https://support.plex.tv/hc/en-us/articles/201774043-What-kind-of-CPU-do-I-need-for-my-Server-

And while the guide mentions Core 2 Duo CPUs, it doesn't even follow it's own guidelines (2000 score for each 1080p stream). 

And as the page mentions, this is a VERY minimum guideline, assuming the system is not doing ANYTHING else.  The more you are doing, the more CPU you need to throw at it.

And while in most cases a "big" CPU isn't necessary, when you start dealing with media streaming, you really should.  Even if you feel it's overkill.

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15 minutes ago, Drashna Jaelre (WGS) said:

Then that's the problem here.

Transcoding/re-encoding is a very, very CPU intensive process.  And if you have a few small number of CPU cores available, then it's going to use more CPU time and cause performance issues.

If you plan on transcoding a lot, then you'd want a quad core or better CPU, IMO.

Yeah, thats gonna be a no.

 

I can perfectly steam a 1080 no issues. The problem is that sometimes, for whatever reason, other processes hog the CPU.

 

So, what I would like is to make sure that WMP's streaming service always has full priority over the CPU.

11 minutes ago, Drashna Jaelre (WGS) said:

https://support.plex.tv/hc/en-us/articles/201774043-What-kind-of-CPU-do-I-need-for-my-Server-

And while the guide mentions Core 2 Duo CPUs, it doesn't even follow it's own guidelines (2000 score for each 1080p stream). 

And as the page mentions, this is a VERY minimum guideline, assuming the system is not doing ANYTHING else.  The more you are doing, the more CPU you need to throw at it.

And while in most cases a "big" CPU isn't necessary, when you start dealing with media streaming, you really should.  Even if you feel it's overkill.

I agree the AMD in the N54L is a piece of ****. Noone is going to debate that. 

 

Having said that, I havent had issues with streaming from it.

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